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Call for Papers, Annual Meeting, Online, 22-23 October 2021.

The Northeast Conference on British Studies (NECBS) will hold its 2021 annual meeting on Friday and Saturday, October 22 and 23. The meeting will take place virtually, using Zoom as the online platform.

This year's conference will feature plenary lectures from Margaret Hunt (Uppsala University, Sweden) and James Vernon (University of California, Berkeley). The conference will also hold a roundtable with publishers, focusing on moving from dissertation to first book. 

We solicit the participation of scholars in all areas of British Studies, broadly defined. In particular, we welcome proposals for interdisciplinary panels that draw on the work of historians, literary critics, and scholars in other disciplines, whose focus is on Britain and its empire, from the Middle Ages to the present. Proposals for entire panels on a common theme will be given priority, although individual paper proposals will also be considered if several of them can be assembled to create a viable panel. Proposals for roundtable discussions of a topical work, on current issues in the field, or pedagogical practices with respect to the teaching of particular aspects of British Studies are also encouraged. The typical ninety-minute panel will include three papers (each lasting for roughly twenty minutes) and a chair. (In the interest of allowing greater audience participation in Q&A, the position of “moderator/comment” is optional.) Roundtables may have a looser format.

Proposals should include a general description of the panel or roundtable (including an overall title), a 200-300 word abstract for each paper to be read, and a one-page curriculum vitae for each participant. Please include the address, phone number, and e-mail address of all participants (including the chair and, if applicable, moderator) in the proposal. For panel or roundtable proposals, please note the name of the main contact person. Electronic submissions (as e-mail attachments in Word) are preferred, with all the various materials presented in a single document.

Graduate students, please note: Each year the NECBS Executive Committee awards the David Underdown Memorial Prize to the best graduate student paper presented at the conference. (See details here.)

All submissions must be received by June 1, 2021 (final decisions will be announced in early July 2021).

Please send your proposals to:


Brian Lewis, NECBS Vice President and Program Chair

[email protected]  

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Although the global pandemic compelled the cancellation of our Chicago conference last fall, we have remained committed to holding an in-person annual conference if at all possible. Over the past year, the rate of vaccinations, the gradual but consistent decline in COVID fatalities in the United States, and the roll-out of vaccines in other countries give us optimism that the situation will continue to improve in the coming months and we will be able to create a successful, if possibly smaller, conference this year. 
 
We also remain optimistic with regard to our decision, made in 2018, to hold our event in Atlanta. We strongly condemn the recent passage of voter suppression legislation in Georgia, but we do not think that the best response is to boycott the state. Former gubernatorial candidate and voting rights activist Stacey Abrams has asked organizations not to use this tactic, noting that she doesn't "want to see Georgia families hurt by lost events and jobs. Georgians targeted by voter suppression will be hurt as opportunities go to other states. We should not abandon the victims of malice and lies – we must stand together.” Senator Doug Ossoff has similarly asked corporations not to boycott Georgia.  Leaders have called for organizations to engage instead in constructive protest against the bill, which is our intention: we hope to explore the ongoing impact of racist policies in and beyond the British empire through our conference programming. We also plan to hold our annual reception at Atlanta’s National Center for Civil and Human Rights, symbolizing the NACBS’s commitment to engaging with the history of racism within Britain, the empire and the wider British world. 
 
While we look forward to the prospect of an in-person 2021 NACBS Conference, we recognize and deeply regret that we all continue to face challenges regarding conference travel: international travel bans, institutional travel funding restrictions, and other barriers remain in place.  The NACBS Executive, Program Committee and Local Arrangements Committee have discussed these challenges and our limited options for mitigating them. In order to engage those who cannot attend in person in the ongoing work of the NACBS, we will offer various forms of on-line content before and after the weekend of the conference. We will be sending out information to membership about virtual programming in the months to come.
 
We fully believe in the benefits of in-person academic interaction, which we have all sorely missed in the last year. And we also need to be clear and transparent with our membership about the practicalities of the situation. Cancelling our in-person conference or running a fully hybrid conference are not feasible options owing to our contractual obligations and the costs we would incur.  This year’s regional hosts, the Southern Conference on British Studies, began planning our 2021 meeting three years ago. Our hotel contract with the Atlanta Sheraton was signed prior to the 2019 NACBS national meeting in Vancouver, well before anyone had heard of COVID-19.  Restrictions in our contract—even after we successfully negotiated with the Sheraton to revise some of its terms—prevent cancelling or rescheduling the conference without the NACBS incurring significant financial liabilities.  The expense of running a fully hybrid conference—a possibility our executive director, Laura Beers, exhaustively explored—would be prohibitive. The only way to offset this would be to charge extremely high conference registration fees for both virtual and live attendance. 
 
We remain hopeful that many of us will be able to come together in Atlanta to share scholarship, to reunite with those whose company we have sorely missed over the past year, and to address the issues of race and inclusivity raised by the recent Georgia voting legislation. For those who will not be able to join us in Atlanta, we are committed to creating new virtual spaces so that all of us can connect and share scholarship. Whether in person or online, we look forward to an active and productive 2021.

Best wishes,

The NACBS executive

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Dear colleagues,

The NACBS Program Committee has decided to extend the submission deadline for NACBS Atlanta meeting to June 1. The NACBS Executive and Council are closely monitoring COVID-related developments, and at the moment are planning for a live conference in Atlanta. Members are encouraged to develop their plans for program submissions as best as they are able and the Program Committee will follow a standard process of selection.

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The NACBS Graduate and Early Career Caucus is happy to announce the finalized schedule for a Spring 2021 Virtual Professional Development Series. These workshops will all take place via Zoom and will last approximately 90 minutes. We’ve done our best to vary the start times in hopes of accommodating folks in different time zones. Each discussion will have extensive Q&A time, so please bring your questions!

The first workshop entitled “Publishing Your First Article” will take place next Friday, March 26th at 2:00pm EST (11:00am PST / 6:00pm GMT). The panel will include journal editors Sandra den Otter (Journal of British Studies), Jeffrey Collins (Journal of British Studies), and Erik Linstrum (Twentieth Century British History). Register for this workshop here

The second workshop, “Teaching Your First/a New Course,” will be on Wednesday, April 14th at 3:00pm EST (12:00pm PST / 8:00pm GMT). Deborah Valenze (Barnard College) and Michelle Brock (Washington & Lee University) will discuss various aspects of preparing a new course and offer tips for first-time teachers. Register for this workshop here

The third workshop, “How to Write a Winning Grant Proposal,” will be Friday, May 7th at 1:00pm EST (10:00am PST / 6:00pm GMT). Our panelists will include: Amanda Herbert (Folger Institute), Steve Hindle (Huntington Library), Tim Alborn (Lehman College), and Natalya Din-Kariuki (University of Warwick). They will offer valuable advice from the perspective of both grant-reviewers and grant-writers. Register for this workshop here

Lastly, “Cover Letters, CVs, and the Academic Job Search” will take place Friday, May 28th at 12:30pm EST (9:30am PST / 5:30pm GMT). Caroline Shaw (Bates College), Nadja Durbach (University of Utah), and Paul Halliday (University of Virginia) will discuss what academic search committees are looking for and offer tips for tackling the academic market. Register for this workshop here.

These workshops will offer an opportunity to interact with and gain insight from a diverse range of experts in British Studies. We hope that participation in these events will also help begin to foster a sense of community among current and recent graduates in the field.

Please contact [email protected] if you have any questions or feedback on the group’s activities. We hope to see you at some of the upcoming events!

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The Rights Task Force of the NACBS, the NACBS Graduate and Early Career Caucus, and the Southern Conference on British Studies (co-sponsor of the 2021 NACBS Conference) are joining together to sponsor a Zoom session to help early career scholars and individuals from underrepresented groups and fields create panels for the upcoming NACBS 2021 Conference. We hope to meet in Atlanta, Georgia, November 11-14, 2021. 

The Zoom Session will be held Friday, March 5, 12:00 to 1:30PM, Eastern Standard Time.

Individuals should come to the Zoom session prepared to recount a two-minute summary of the work they would like to present at the conference.

Senior scholars interested in helping junior scholars and those representing or researching underrepresented groups should also attend, and identify themselves as willing to provide the comment, serve as a chair, or provide an additional paper for a panel.

If you are unable to make the meeting but would like to participate, send a few brief sentences, identifying yourself, what you would like to present, or on what type of panels you would be willing to chair or comment. Email this to [email protected] and the statements will be compiled and shared with participates at the live event.

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0od-isrTItG9b7oCkA4q7WgOEZmSLgIvZl

Chuck Upchurch and Joy Dixon,
Co-chairs of the NACBS Rights Task Force
[email protected]
 
Alison Hight and Megan Groninger
Co-chairs of the NACBS Graduate and Early Career Caucus
[email protected]
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January
15
2021

CFP: NACBS Annual Meeting 2021, Atlanta

Posted by rdaily under CFP | Tags: 2021, annual meeting, Atlanta | 0 Comments

NORTH AMERICAN CONFERENCE ON

BRITISH STUDIES


ANNUAL MEETING
Atlanta, Georgia
November 11-14, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS
Deadline: 1 April 2021

 

The NACBS and its affiliate, the Southern Conference on British Studies (SCBS), seek participation by scholars in all areas of British Studies for the 2021 meeting. We hope to meet in Atlanta, Georgia, November 11-14, 2021. We solicit proposals for presentations on Britain, the British Empire-Commonwealth, and the British world, including Ireland, the Americas, Asia, Africa, and the Pacific (etc.). Our interests range from the medieval to the modern. We welcome participation by scholars from across the humanities and social sciences, from all parts of the globe, and from all career stages and backgrounds. We reaffirm our commitment to British Studies broadly conceived, and welcome proposals that reflect the diversity of scholars and scholarship in the field.

We invite panel proposals that address selected themes, methodology, and pedagogy, as well as roundtable discussions and lightening rounds (8-10 presenters with one chair, a few minutes to each presenter) of topical and thematic interest, including conversations among authors of recent books, reflections on landmark scholarship, and discussions about professional practice. We are particularly interested in submissions that have a broad chronological range and/or interdisciplinary breadth, and that are tightly connected by a theme.  Standard panels typically include three presenters speaking for 20 minutes each, a commentator, and a chair, while roundtables typically include four presenters speaking for 15 minutes each and a chair. We are open to other formats, though; please feel free to consult with the program committee chair.

To secure a broad range of participation, we will also consider individual paper proposals. Panels that include a diverse mix of presenters across fields and career stages are particularly welcome. To foster intellectual interchange, we ask applicants to compose panels that feature participation from multiple institutions. In an effort to allow a broader range of participants, no participant will be permitted to take part in more than one session in a substantial role. (That is, someone presenting or commenting on one panel cannot also present or comment on another, though individuals presenting or commenting on one panel may serve as chairs for other panels, if need be.) Submissions are welcome from participants in last year’s conference, though if the number of strong submissions exceeds the number of available spaces, selection decisions may take into account recent participation.

As complete panels are more likely to be accepted, we recommend that interested participants issue calls on H-Albion or social media (e.g., @TheNACBS on Twitter or on the NACBS Facebook page) to arrange a panel. If a full panel cannot be arranged by the deadline, however, please do submit the individual proposal and the program committee will try to build submissions into full panels as appropriate.

In addition to the panels, we will be sponsoring a poster session.  The posters will be exhibited throughout the conference, and there will be a scheduled time when presenters will be with their posters to allow for further discussion. 

The submission website at http://www.nacbs.org/conference will open in early February; submissions will close as of 1 April 2021.

All submissions must be electronic, and need to be completed in one sitting.   Before you start your submission, you should have the following information:

  1. Names, affiliations and email addresses for all panel participants.  PLEASE NOTE: We create the program from the submission, so be sure that names, institutional titles, and paper titles are provided as they should appear on the program.
  2. A note whether data projection is necessary, desired, or unnecessary. Please only request if AV is central to convey your presentation.  (Because AV is now enormously expensive, it will be provided in only some of the meeting rooms.)
  3. A brief summary CV for each participant, indicating education, current affiliations, and major publications.   (Two-page maximum per CV.)
  4. Title and Abstract for each paper or presentation.   Roundtables do not need titles for each presentation, but if you have them, that is fine.  If there is no title, there should still be an abstract – i.e. “X will speak about this subject through the lens of this period/approach/region etc.”
  5. POSTERS: Those proposing posters should enter organizer information and first presenter information only.

All communication will be through the panel organizer, who will be responsible for ensuring that members of the panel receive the information they need.

All program presenters must be current members of the NACBS by October 11, one month before the conference, or risk being removed from the program.

Some financial assistance will become available for graduate students (up to $500) and for a limited number of under/unemployed members within ten years of their terminal degree ($300). Details of these travel grants and how to apply will be posted to www.nacbs.org and emailed to members after the program for the 2021 meeting is prepared.

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Graduate students and early career scholars are invited to attend a virtual interest meeting on the formation of a Graduate and Early Career Caucus under the aegis of the North American Conference on British Studies. The meeting will take place Friday, January 22, at 12:30pm EST. This initiative hopes to draw on the established NACBS network and the accessibility of Zoom technology to foster a greater sense of community among emerging scholars in the field of British Studies (broadly defined). The meeting will be a space to gauge interest in establishing such a group and to discuss the various types of programming it might provide to graduate and early career scholars. This may include practical workshops on teaching, publishing, grant-writing, career diversity, etc., as well as virtual Q&A sessions with established scholars in the field. The group could also offer a forum for discussing graduate and early career concerns and communicating them to the NACBS Council as necessary. Most importantly, it will be a way for the field’s emerging scholars to connect with one another-- virtually for now, but hopefully in-person at conferences and archives in the future.


Register for the interest meeting here to receive the Zoom link. This meeting is being organized by two graduate student members of NACBS. Please feel free to contact us with any questions or comments at [email protected] and [email protected]. We hope to see you there!

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November
27
2020

NACBS Emergency Funding Grants

Posted by rdaily under emergency grant | Tags: covid-19, covid19, graduate students, pandemic | 0 Comments

 
The North American Conference on British Studies announces a new funding program intended to assist scholars in British Studies who have been financially affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. The NACBS has established $500 emergency grants that can be used to cover unexpected loss of income related to this crisis.  

Eligibility: Un/underemployed British Studies scholars located in North America, including advanced graduate students and recent PhDs, who have demonstrated financial need and who do not currently have full-time/salaried employment. Those who are fully supported by a graduate program, postdoc, or full-time temporary or tenure-track position are not eligible. Applicants must have been a member of the NACBS within the last three years. 

Application process: 

  1. Applicants should submit a cover letter and CV to [email protected]. They need not include a detailed budget, but they should explain their financial need in broad terms and indicate how the funding would help stabilize their circumstances or help them achieve their professional goals. Applicants should also request that their advisor, department chair, or other supervisor send to the same email address a brief letter verifying their current standing, as soon as possible after the application is submitted. Please include your PayPal email address (for payment via PayPal) or your mailing address (for payment via check).
  2. Awards will be made on a rolling basis, until the allocated funds are expended.

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The NACBS Executive is pleased to announce two new officers:
 
Megan Groninger is the first to fill the newly-created office of graduate student representative on the NACBS Council. Megan is a fourth-year PhD student at Florida State University, and she focuses on 19th century British history with minor fields in gender and sexuality, the Atlantic World, and the Islamic World. Her dissertation examines constructions of motherhood as a site from which to argue for broader social and political agendas from the early to mid-19th century and the way these constructions intersected with both class and race. She is a previous recipient of the NACBS M.A. Essay Prize and has been active in the Southern Conference on British Studies.
 
David Chan Smith is assuming the office of Associate Executive Secretary on the NACBS Executive Committee. David is Associate Professor of History at Wilfred Laurier University and has published research on British studies from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries. For the previous three years he has served on the NACBS program committee. He is also closely involved in interdisciplinary conversations with economics, law and management, and is exploring how historians can further engage audiences in these disciplinary areas. Finally, a committed digital humanist, Smith is creating a database of prosecutions for smuggling during the eighteenth century in order to better understand the political economy of clandestine trade.
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Approved by AHA Council, September 23, 2020

On September 17, the White House announced, “In commemoration of Constitution Day, President Trump will travel to the National Archives to participate in a discussion on the liberal indoctrination of America’s youth through the 1619 Project, Critical Race Theory, and other misleading, radical ideologies with a diverse group of professors, historians, and scholars. The President will deliver remarks on his Administration’s efforts to promote a more balanced, accurate, and patriotic curricula in America’s schools.”

This hastily assembled “White House Conference on American History” took place in the Rotunda of the National Archives, although the National Archives and Records Administration had no role in organizing the program. The organizers of the event neither informed nor consulted associations of professional historians. 

The American Historical Association addresses this “conference” and the president’s ill-informed observations about American history and history education reluctantly and with dismay. The event was clearly a campaign stunt, deploying the legitimating backdrop of the Rotunda, home of the nation’s founding documents, to draw distinctions between the two political parties on education policy, tie one party to civil disorder, and enable the president to explicitly attack his opponent. Like the president’s claim at Mount Rushmore two months ago that “our children are taught in school to hate their own country,” this political theater stokes culture wars that are meant to distract Americans from other, more pressing current issues. The AHA only reluctantly gives air to such distraction; we are not interested in inflating a brouhaha that is a mere sideshow to the many perils facing our nation at this moment. 

Past generations of historians participated in promoting a mythical view of the United States. Missing from this conventional narrative were essential themes that we now recognize as central to a complete understanding of our nation’s past. As scholars, we locate and evaluate evidence, which we use to craft stories about the past that are inclusive and able to withstand critical scrutiny. In the process, we engage in lively and at times heated conversations with each other about the meaning of evidence and ways to interpret it. As teachers, we encourage our students to question conventional wisdom as well as their own assumptions, but always with an emphasis on evidence. It is not appropriate for us to censor ourselves or our students when it comes to discussing past events and developments. To purge history of its unsavory elements and full complexity would be a disservice to history as a discipline and the nation, and in the process would render a rich, fascinating story dull and uninspiring.

The AHA deplores the use of history and history education at all grade levels and other contexts to divide the American people, rather than use our discipline to heal the divisions that are central to our heritage. Healing those divisions requires an understanding of history and an appreciation for the persistent struggles of Americans to hold the nation accountable for falling short of its lofty ideals. To learn from our history we must confront it, understand it in all its messy complexity, and take responsibility as much for our failures as our accomplishments.

The following organizations have cosigned this statement:

African American Intellectual History Society
Agricultural History Society
American Anthropological Association
American Journalism Historians Association
American Society for Environmental History
American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies
American Sociological Association
American Studies Association
Chinese Historians in United States
Committee on LGBT History
Conference on Asian History
Conference on Latin American History
Forum on Early-Modern Empires and Global Interactions
French Colonial Historical Society
Immigration and Ethnic History Society
John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education 
Massachusetts Historical Society
Medieval Academy of America
Modern Greek Studies Association
North American Conference on British Studies
Phi Beta Kappa Society
Radical History Journal
Shakespeare Association of America
Society for Austrian and Habsburg History
Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Society of Automotive Historians
Society of Civil War Historians
Southern Historical Association
World History Association

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