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food.jpgCALL FOR PAPERS NOW OPEN
Food in History: Anglo-American Conference 2013, 11-12 July 2013
Senate House (London)
 
From famine to feast, from grain riots to TV cookery programmes, dieting to domesticity, food features in almost every aspect of human societies since prehistoric times. At its annual summer conference in 2013 the Institute of Historical Research aims to showcase the best of current scholarly writing, research and debate on the subject. Our plenary lecturers include Ken Albala, Susanne Freidberg, Cormac O’Grada and Steven Shapin. The  conference will include a publishers’ book fair, policy forum, film screenings and a historic food recreation event. Bursaries will be available enabling postgraduate students to attend.
 
Panel proposals (three papers each plus chair) and individual paper proposals are invited on topics across the full range of food history from ancient to contemporary times, and from all areas of the world: for example: food technology and regulation; global foods and the globalisation of food trade; migration and culinary culture; restaurants; food religion and status; diet and nutrition; individual commodities; agriculture, distribution and markets; retail, advertising and consumption. Early career researchers are particularly encouraged to participate.
 
Please send your proposal to Foodinhistory@lon.ac.ukby 15 December 2012. The finalised conference programme will be published in January 2013.


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Ancients and Moderns
81st Anglo-American Conference of Historians
5-6 July 2012
Senate House, London

Registrations are now open for this year’s Anglo-American Conference of Historians, this year on the theme of 
Ancients and Moderns.

With the Olympics upon us in the UK it seems an appropriate moment to think more broadly about the ways in which the classical world resonates in our own times, and how successive epochs of modernity since the Renaissance have situated themselves in relation to the various ancient civilisations. From political theory to aesthetics, across the arts of war and of peace, to concepts of education, family, gender, race and slavery, it is hard to think of a facet of the last millennium which has not been informed by the ancient past and through a range of media, including museums, painting, poetry, film and the built environment. The Institute’s 81st Anglo-American conference seeks to represent the full extent of work on classical receptions, welcoming not only those scholars who work on Roman, Greek and Judaeo-Christian legacies and influences, but also historians of the ancient kingdoms and empires of Asia and pre-Colombian America.

Our plenary lecturers include: Paul Cartledge (Cambridge), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Mark Lewis (Stanford), Sanjay Subrahmanyam (UCLA) and David Womersley (Oxford).

For programme and registrations details, please visit www.history.ac.uk/aach12 or contact the IHR Events Office at AncientsandModerns@lon.ac.uk or on 0207 862 8756.

 

The University of London is an exempt charity in England and Wales and a charity registered in Scotland (reg. no. SC041194)

 

 

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CALL FOR PAPERS

81st Anglo-American Conference of Historians: Ancients and Moderns
Thursday 5th and Friday 6th July 2012
Senate House, London

Dear Colleague

May I draw your attention to the Call for Papers for next year’s Anglo-American conference of Historians which is taking Ancients and Moderns as its theme. Full details of the conference can be found at www.history.ac.uk/aach12. In order to ensure we get as full a range of topics and speakers as possible we have extended the deadline for the Call for Papers to 9th January 2012. Please do pass on this information and circulate conference details to anyone who might find it of interest.

The Institute’s 81st Anglo-American conference seeks to represent the full extent of work on classical receptions, welcoming not only those scholars who work on Roman, Greek and Judaeo-Christian legacies and influences, but also historians of the ancient kingdoms and empires of Asia and pre-Colombian America. Our plenary lecturers include: Paul Cartledge (Cambridge), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Mark Lewis (Stanford), Sanjay Subrahmanyam (UCLA) and David Womersley (Oxford).

Proposals for individual papers, panels (of up to three papers and a session chair) and roundtables are invited. Please send a half-page abstract to the IHR Events Officer at AncientsandModerns@lon.ac.uk by 9th January 2012. Acceptance of proposals will be confirmed by 20th January 2012 and the full conference programme published at the end of January. Registrations open on 1st February 2012. For any queries, please contact the IHR Events Office at IHR.Events@sas.ac.uk on 0207 862 8756.

Best wishes

Professor Miles Taylor
Director, IHR

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CALL FOR PAPERS
Ancients and Moderns:
81st Anglo-American Conference of Historians

5-6 July 2012
Senate House, London

With the Olympics upon us in the UK it seems an appropriate moment to think more broadly about the ways in which the classical world resonates in our own times, and how successive epochs of modernity since the Renaissance have situated themselves in relation to the various ancient civilisations. From political theory to aesthetics, across the arts of war and of peace, to concepts of education, family, gender, race and slavery, it is hard to think of a facet of the last millennium which has not been informed by the ancient past and through a range of media, including painting, poetry, film and the built environment. The Institute’s 81st Anglo-American conference seeks to represent the full extent of work on classical receptions, welcoming not only those scholars who work on Roman, Greek and Judaeo-Christian legacies and influences, but also historians of the ancient kingdoms and empires of Asia and pre-Colombian America. Our plenary lecturers include: Paul Cartledge (Cambridge), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Mark Lewis (Stanford), Sanjay Subrahmanyam (UCLA) and David Womersley (Oxford).

Proposals for individual papers, panels (of up to three papers and a session chair) and roundtables are invited. Please send a half-page abstract to the Events Officer, Institute of Historical Research at AncientsandModerns@lon.ac.uk by 1 December 2011. Acceptance of proposals will be confirmed by 31st December and the full conference programme published at the end of January. Registrations open on 1 March 2012. Further information on the conference can be found at www.history.ac.uk/aach12.

On behalf of the 2012 Anglo-American Conference Programme Committee:

Hugh Bowden, King’s College, London
Catherine Edwards, Birkbeck College, London
Mike Edwards, Institute of Classical Studies
Rosemary Sweet, University of Leicester
Miles Taylor, Institute of Historical Research
Giorgios Varouxakis, Queen Mary University of London

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2011 Anglo-American Conference: Health in History

29th June – 1st July 2011
Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies, Thornhaugh Street, London WC1H 0XG
www.history.ac.uk/aac2011
Supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Royal Society of Medicine

This year, the Institute of Historical Research will be holding its flagship event, the Anglo-American Conference, on the subject of Health in History. The history of medicine and of human society in sickness and health is an ever widening window through which the present can view the past. The study of the ways in which societies over time and at war and in peace have defined and treated their ‘sick’, the changing content and status of medical expertise and ethics, and those episodic moments when the globe has been transformed by epidemic, panic and panacea is now an integral part of mainstream history.

The medical humanities are now critically placed in most cultures at the meeting point of research and social policy. The 80th Anglo-American Conference of Historians will feature papers and panels across all periods and areas of the history of medicine. Plenary lecturers include David Arnold, Joanna Bourke, Samuel Cohn, Mary Fissell, Monica Green, Helen King and Paul Starr. The conference will also feature a Publishers’ Fair featuring major international publishers such as Oxford University Press, I B Tauris and Wiley-Blackwell among many others. A Policy Forum organised by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine will also be taking place during the conference, with key academic and professional health experts discussing the role played by historians in the policy environment.

The 3-day conference will be taking place just around the corner from Senate House at the Brunei Gallery, part of the School of Oriental and African Studies on Thornhaugh Street, London. A wine and canapé reception will also be held on Friday evening at the Wellcome Collection (Euston Road, London) and will feature a private viewing of their latest exhibition, ‘Dirt’.

For programme and registration details, please visit http://www.history.ac.uk/aac2011 . For any queries, please contact the IHR Events Office at healthinhistory@sas.ac.uk or on 0207 862 8756.

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Next July, the annual conference of the Institute of Historical Research is taking as its theme environmental history. Over two days we shall feature a series of lectures, panels, policy forums, exhibitions and book launches devoted to this exciting field. We have lined up some of the world's top experts as keynote speakers: William Beinart, Alfred Crosby, Harriet Ritvo and Donald Worster, and shall be ensuring that there is full press coverage. We anticipate over 300 registrations.

I am writing now to give you advance warning of the event, at which I hope very much you will wish to join us in some shape of form. We will be back in the South Block of Senate House, ie: using the Beveridge Hall and the surrounding reception area and galleries for the main events. Do let us know as soon as possible if you would like to be involved, and please pass on news of the conference to your colleagues and graduate students. Details of the cfp are below.

As always, we are grateful for your support, and may I thank those NABCS colleagues particularly for helping to make Cities in 2009 such a success. The Anglo-American conference has been running at the IHR since 1921 and is the main national history event of the academic calendar. This is a wonderful opportunity for us and for you to communicate to the wider history community some of the findings and concerns of the environmental sector past, present and future.

I shall be attending the NACBS in Louisville next month and looking forward to updating you with more news on the AA2010 and other IHR developments then.

Yours sincerely,

(Professor) Miles Taylor, 
Director of the Institute of Historical Research
Anglo-American Conference 2010: Environments
Call for papers now open at www.history.ac.uk/aac2010

For further details please contact: jennifer.wallis@sas.ac.uk

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Registration is now open for 'Cities', the 78th Anglo-American
Conference of Historians, to be held at the Institute of Historical
Research, London, 2-3 July 2009.

We are delighted to announce that our keynote speakers will be Wim
Blockmans, Swati Chattopadhyay, Derek Keene, and Lynn Hollen Lees.
Altogether, more than 80 speakers will be presenting papers on a wide
range of themes, covering the development of cities across the world
from the ancient world to the present day.

The conference includes a publishers' fair, exhibition, and a
reception, to be hosted at London's historic Guildhall by the City of
London Corporation.

Full details of the programme, delegate rates and online booking
information are available at http://www.history.ac.uk/aac2009.

Matthew Davies

--
Dr Matthew Davies
Chair, 'Cities' Programme Committee
Centre for Metropolitan History
Institute of Historical Research
Senate House
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

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December
4
2008

Anglo American conference of historians 2009: Cities

Posted by jaskelly under Announcement | Tags: anglo american conference, cfp, IHR | 0 Comments

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Anglo American conference of historians 2009: Cities
Institute of Historical Research, 2 - 3 July 2009

For 10,000 years cities have shaped the affairs of mankind. Now, more than half of the world's population is urban, dwelling in settlements that we identify as 'city' or 'town', some of them so extensive and so complex that they seem to transcend traditional notions of urban organisation and form.

While the impact of cities has grown rapidly in recent times, its essential nature has been apparent from the beginning. Cities mark the transition from nomadic to settled society and drive the development of agriculture and ideas of the rural, as well the exploitation of water, minerals and other natural resources. As both organising forces and habitats, cities are at least as important for animals as for humans. They rest on networks of contracts that regulate the exchange of goods and services and the management of risk, yet the instabilities that characterised pre-urban societies remain with us today, and in many new forms.

Cities facilitate the aggregation of wealth and power and the emergence of distinctive religions, beliefs, cultural behaviour, social structures and institutions. They evolve laws and governmental systems to deal with the particular problems of urban life, including those arising from disorder and disease. As sites of inquiry and information exchange they promote knowledge and understanding of the wider world.

Within the city, the key public locations are those of the market, popular assembly, power, authority, religion and defence, while the occupation of spaces for work, residence and recreation is exceptionally dense. In meeting these and other needs, cities promote innovation in building and architecture, often so as to fulfil the ambitions of the powerful. City plans and forms can also bear symbolic meaning and express ideas of social, political, economic or cosmological order. Such environments are often oppressive or corrupting, yet many cities also offer the individual a freedom of thought and expression not found elsewhere.

Cities' relations with subordinate settlements and with other cities, along with their need to control territory and communications, give them a central role in the formation of states and empires, and now in the process of globalisation. At the same time, they absorb and express the characteristics of the regions in which they lie and of more distant places with which they have contact. With migration and trade they become places where languages and cultures co-exist, intermingle or merge.

The conference will deal with cities throughout the world. Proposals are sought for papers or panel sessions on any aspect of city life, form, ideology and culture over this period. Thematic contributions making comparisons over time or across space will be especially welcome, as will those on networks of cities and their role in cultural formation, on the relations between cities, territories and larger political units, on the ideologies and cosmologies of the city and on what distinguishes the city or town from other forms of settlement or ways of life.

Many of these topics are touched on in general writing on cities, but it is remarkable how rarely they are subject to serious historical analysis. This raises questions for our understanding of cities now, when so much of their past as invoked in relation to the present is misunderstood. As so many of us mass together in cities, are we at a turning point in our identity as humans? Or does past experience of cities offer some clues for the future, whether one of hope or of disaster?

For more information visit: http://www.history.ac.uk/aac2009/

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