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Reviews in History - New Reviews for February 2011

Published: August 23, 2012

The following reviews of possible interest to followers of The British and Irish Studies Intelligencer were published in December in the Institute of Historical Research's e-journal Reviews in History.

Firstly Pat Starkey welcomes an important addition to the growing literature on child migration, with her review (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1033) of Child, Nation, Race and Empire. Child Rescue Discourse, England, Canada and Australia, 1850-1915 by Shurlee Swain and Margot Hillel.

Next we have a review article by an old friend of the IHR, David Renton, who casts his eye (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1035) over two recent works on fascism and anti-fascism between the wars – Oswald Mosley and the New Party by Matthew Worley and Varieties of Anti-Fascism: Britain in the Inter-War Period edited by Nigel Copsey and Andrzej Olechnowicz.

Chris Berg surveys (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1039) the historiography of combat resilience in the First World War.

We then move to the 12th century, and Edmund King’s new biography King Stephen, which our reviewer David Crouch finds (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1038) judges Stephen the king harshly, even as it strives to be fair to Stephen the man.

Next, Mark Crowley believes (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1037) readers will understand significantly more about the struggle for female suffrage and its consequent impact after reading Pat Thane and Esther Breitenbach’s edited collection Women and Citizenship in Britain and Ireland in the Twentieth Century: What Difference did the Vote Make?

Matthew McKean reviews (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1036) ProQuest’s British Periodicals Collections I and II, which he welcomes as resources that both enhance history teaching and research, and allow researchers opportunities to do what would have been difficult, if not impossible, with traditional print resources.

Brian Harrison tackles (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1040) No Turning Back: The Peacetime Revolutions of Post-War Britain by Paul Addison – and suggests it may lack the sparkle of his previous books like The Road to 1945.

Finally Ariel Hessayon enjoys a superb inter-disciplinary collaboration, as he describes (http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1043) The Complete Works of Gerrard Winstanley, edited by Thomas N. Corns, Ann Hughes, David Loewenstein.

As always, all comments or suggestions should be sent to danny.millum@sas.ac.uk.

Danny Millum
Deputy Editor, Reviews in History / Editorial Assistant (Web) Institute of Historical Research University of London Senate House Malet Street LONDON WC1E 7HU
t: +44 (0)20 7862 8812
f: +44 (0)20 7862 8754
e: danny.millum@sas.ac.uk

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