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The North American Conference on British Studies meets annually, normally in a joint meeting with one of the regional conferences, and occurs over a weekend, beginning on a Friday. 

The national and regional meetings offer a wide range of sessions as well as opportunity for exchange of views among scholars from around the world. In recent years, the joint national meetings have taken place in Washington, D.C. (2016), Little Rock (2015), Minneapolis (2014), Portland (2013), Montreal (2012), Denver (2011), Baltimore (2010), Louisville (2009), Cincinnati (2008), San Francisco (2007), Boston (2006), Denver (2005), Philadelphia (2004), Portland (2003), Baltimore (2002), Toronto (2001), Pasadena (2000), Cambridge (1999), Colorado Springs (1998), Pacific Grove, CA (1997), Chicago (1996), Washington, D.C. (1995), Vancouver (1994), Montreal (1993), and Boulder (1992).

The NACBS also participates at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association in January. From time to time, the NACBS cooperates with other organizations in the sponsorship of major scholarly symposiums, in association with the Royal Historical Society, the British Association for American Studies, and others.

Other events and information are regularly updated on H-Albion, the H-Net discussion list in British and Irish history.

NORTH AMERICAN CONFERENCE ON BRITISH STUDIES ANNUAL MEETING

Providence, Rhode Island, October 25-28, 2018

'The conference will be held at the Omni Providence Hotel. Guest rooms can be booked here for $189 per night plus taxes. 

Note: Conference sessions begin on the morning of Friday, October 26, but a reception will be held for graduate students on the evening of Thursday, October 25.

Details on registration will be posted soon.

Submissions are closed as of March 30th, 2018

The NACBS and its affiliate, the Northeast Conference on British Studies, seek participation by scholars in all areas of British Studies for the 2018 meeting. We will meet in Providence, Rhode Island, from October 25-28, 2018. We solicit proposals for presentations on Britain, the British Empire, and the British world, including topics relating to component parts of Britain and on British influence (or vice versa) in Ireland, the Commonwealth, and former colonies in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean (etc.) Our interests range from the medieval to the modern. We welcome participation by scholars from across the humanities and social sciences, from all parts of the globe (not just North America), and from all career stages and backgrounds. We reaffirm our commitment to British Studies broadly conceived, and welcome proposals that reflect the diversity of scholars and scholarship in the field.

We invite panel proposals that address selected themes, methodology, and pedagogy, as well as roundtable discussions of topical and thematic interest, including conversations among authors of recent books, reflections on landmark scholarship, and discussions about professional practice.  We are particularly interested in submissions that have a broad chronological focus and/or interdisciplinary breadth.  Standard panels typically include three presenters speaking for 20 minutes each, a commentator, and a chair, while roundtables typically include four presenters speaking for 15 minutes each and a chair. We are open to other formats, though; please feel free to consult with the program committee chair.

We hope to secure as broad a range of participation as possible and will thus consider individual paper proposals in addition to the standard full panel proposals. Our preference is for panels that include both emerging and established scholars; we welcome the participation of junior scholars and Ph.D. candidates beyond the qualifying stage. To foster intellectual interchange, we ask applicants to compose panels that feature participation from multiple institutions. In an effort to allow a broader range of participants, no participant will be permitted to take part in more than one session in a substantial role. (That is, someone presenting or commenting on one panel cannot also present or comment on another, though individuals presenting or commenting on one panel may serve as chairs for other panels, if need be.) Submissions are welcome from participants in last year’s conference, though if the number of strong submissions exceeds the number of available spaces, selection decisions may take into account recent participation.

As complete panels are more likely to be accepted, we recommend that interested participants issue calls on H-Albion or social media (e.g., @TheNACBS on Twitter or on the NACBS Facebook page) to arrange a panel. If a full panel cannot be arranged by the deadline, however, please do submit the individual proposal and the program committee will try to build submissions into full panels as appropriate.

In addition to the panels, we will be sponsoring a poster session.  The posters will be exhibited throughout the conference, and there will be a scheduled time when presenters will be with their posters to allow for further discussion. 

Submissions closed as of March 30 2018.

All submissions are electronic, and need to be completed in one sitting.   Before you start your submission, you should have the following information:

  1. Names, affiliations and email addresses for all panel participants.  PLEASE NOTE: We create the program from the submission, so be sure that names, institutional titles, and paper titles are provided as they should appear on the program.  
  2. A note whether data projection is necessary, desired, or unnecessary.
  3. A brief summary CV for each participant, indicating education, current affiliations, and major publications.   (750 words maximum per CV.)
  4. Title and Abstract for each paper or presentation.   Roundtables do not need titles for each presentation, but if you have them, that is fine.  If there is no title, there should still be an abstract – i.e. “X will speak about this subject through the lens of this period/approach/region etc.”
  5. POSTERS: Those proposing posters should enter organizer information and first presenter information only.

All communication will be through the panel organizer, who will be responsible for ensuring that members of the panel receive the information they need.

All program presenters must be current members of the NACBS by September 28, one month before the conference, or risk being removed from the program.

Some financial assistance will become available for graduate students (up to $500) and for a limited number of under/unemployed members within ten years of their terminal degree ($300). Details of these travel grants and how to apply will be posted to www.nacbs.org and emailed to members after the program for the 2018 meeting is prepared.

 

Workshop Calls for Proposals: Populations and Altruism

NACBS Annual Meeting

Providence, RI, October 25-28, 2018

 Early Modern Workshop Theme:

“Populations: counting, classifying, moving and managing groups of people in the early modern period”

 DEADLINE EXTENDED: MARCH 5, 2018

Materials: CV and 1-page abstract

This workshop will explore the topic of “populations” in the early modern period. How, by whom, and to what ends were groups of people defined or treated as populations? What were the intellectual and practical consequences of such classifications? What historical or historiographical legacies have they had? How do historians’ definitions of “population” replicate or resist early modern categories and practices? How do current social-scientific, political, or legal understandings of population help or hinder historical analysis? Papers may address these questions from perspectives including but not limited to migration and colonization; slavery, race and ethnicity; reproduction; medicine and health; religious and national difference; political economy and governance; political arithmetic and information.

The session will include 6-8 pre-circulated papers of 15-25 pages each. Participants will be chosen with a view to the complementarity of their research topics and strong preference will be given to graduate students and early career scholars. Participants must be prepared to submit their papers by September 30, 2018. Each participant will be required to read all papers for the session, and to share written comments on two of the papers, prior to the conference. The session itself will include brief presentations and discussions of each paper, followed by a more extensive conversation between participants and the audience around common questions and themes.

Those interested must submit a CV and a one-page abstract to Rachel Weil (rjw5@cornell.edu) and Ted McCormick (ted.mccormick@concordia.ca) by MARCH 5.

 Note: Those not accepted for the early modern workshop may still submit proposals for NACBS poster sessions, or paper or panel proposals for regular NACBS sessions, by the general deadline of March 30, 2018. Some financial assistance will be available for graduate students (up to US$500) and for a limited number of under/unemployed members within ten years of their terminal degree (US$300). Details of these travel grants will be posted to www.nacbs.org and emailed to members once the 2018 meeting program is prepared.

 

Modern Workshop Theme:

 “Altruism and Its Discontents: Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development”

DEADLINE EXTENDED: MARCH 5, 2018

Materials: CV and 1-page abstract

This workshop will explore human rights, humanitarianism, and development in the modern period, c. 1800-2000, through the prism of “altruism.” While usually treated separately, each of these areas of endeavor grapples with often competing interests in projects aimed at improving the lives of others, some altruistic, others less so. We seek papers that engage critically in human rights, humanitarianism, or development, with special consideration for those positioned at their intersections. What has been the relationship between humanitarianism and discourses on human rights and how has it changed over time? How do we explain the dynamics of imperialism, internationalism, and foreign intervention? Humanitarian intervention and development? Or, empire, decolonization, and “development” projects? Where were projects made and unmade and how? What were their costs and who bore them? Where did these discourses or projects fit within anti-colonial resistance or in the civic life of post-colonial societies? While our emphasis is on British engagement in the world, we welcome equally papers that examine the reception of these projects among local populations and/or that put British actors in comparative or international context.

The session will include 6-8 pre-circulated papers of 15-25 pages each. Participants will be chosen with a view to the complementarity of their research topics and strong preference will be given to graduate students and early career scholars. Participants must be prepared to submit their papers by September 30, 2018. Each participant will be required to read all papers for the session, and to share written comments on two of the papers, prior to the conference. The session itself will include brief presentations and discussions of each paper, followed by a more extensive conversation between participants and the audience around common questions and themes.

Those interested must submit a CV and a one-page abstract to Caroline Shaw (cshaw@bates.edu) and Matthew Hilton (m.hilton@qmul.ac.uk) by MARCH 5, 2018.

Note: Those not accepted for the workshop may still submit proposals for the NACBS poster session, or paper or panel proposals for regular NACBS sessions, by the general deadline of March 30, 2018. Some financial assistance will be available for graduate students (up to US$500) and for a limited number of under/unemployed NACBS members within ten years of their terminal degree (US$300). Details of these travel grants will be posted to www.nacbs.org and emailed to members once the 2018 meeting program is prepared.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

The current draft of this year's program can be found below.

NACBS 2017 Annual Conference Program


Note: A trove of images from last year's Washington meeting, taken by photographer Sancha McBurnie, is available for perusal on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/gp/152251154@N02/4B5j5F
Enjoy!

CONFERENCE CONTACTS

If you have questions about the submission process or suggestions for program development, please contact:

Krista Kesselring
NACBS Program Chair
Professor of History
Dalhousie University
Email: nacbsprogram@gmail.com

REGIONAL CONFERENCES

In addition to the national meeting, each of the regions holds their own annual conference. The following calls for papers or programs for regional meetings are available:

Middle Atlantic (MACBS)
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 7-8 April, 2018
 
Midwest Conference on British Studies (MWCBS)
St. Louis, MO, September 29-October 1, 2017

North East (NECBS)
Beverly, MA, 13-14 October, 2017
 
Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies (PCCBS)
Victoria, BC (Canada), 3-5 March 2017

Southern (SCBS) 
Dallas, TX, 10-11 November, 2017
 
Western (WCBS)
San Antonio, Texas, 28-29 September, 2018

 

After a very successful joint meeting at Portland with the NACBS in 2003, Northwest Conference on British Studies (NWCBS) voted to disband this regional, with NWCBS members to be affiliated with either the Pacific Coast CBS or the Western CBS. But NWCBS continues to exist, virtually, with an unmoderated NWCBS listserv (to which all in the region are invited to subscribe).

UPCOMING NACBS MEETINGS 


Vancouver, Canada, November 14-17, 2019