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The official publication of the North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), the Journal of British Studies, has positioned itself as the critical resource for scholars of British culture from the Middle Ages through the present. Drawing on both established and emerging approaches, JBS presents scholarly articles and books reviews from renowned international authors who share their ideas on British society, politics, law, economics, and the arts. In 2005 (Vol. 44), the journal merged with the NACBS publication Albion, creating one journal for NACBS membership.


NACBS-FOLGER FELLOWSHIP, 2020 COMPETITION

The Folger Institute and the North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS) offer a residential fellowship for scholars of the British world who are working on topics from the early modern period through to the present day. While the Folger is rightly known as a destination for early modernists, this fellowship also encourages use of its extraordinary 18th-, 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century collections in modern Britain and the British Empire. The fellowship provides between $3,000-$8,000 for a scholar to spend up to three months working in the Folger library between June and December, 2020.  

Deadline: March 1, 2020
 
Applicants must apply through the Folger short-term fellowships process, using the application portal found here:  https://www.folger.edu/fellowships

RECENT AWARD WINNERS 

Ruma Chopra (San José State University), “Between God and Darwin: Early Modern Transitions in Understandings about Climate.”

Chopra seeks to explore how people in the early modern era construed the relationship between humans and climate in the midst of colonization, conquest, and global travel. It is multidisciplinary, drawing together insights from studies of geography, medicine, and psychology to draw ethical, economic, and political lessons from moments of intercultural contact. The project demonstrates how supposedly “rational” Enlightenment ideologies instead offered a complex of many diverse narratives, borrowed as much from classical assumptions about climate and character, as from pseudo-scientific arguments, and thereby speaks to the deep history of racial ideologies and racism. 

PREVIOUS AWARD WINNERS